Author Topic: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project  (Read 2123 times)

tesgt350

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 476
    • View Profile
    • FRIENDS OF THE HAWK
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #30 on: June 25, 2020, 10:13:01 AM »
Question:  How would you go about proving to the DMV that this is one of the Re-Vined 69 Shelby's and should have a 1970 Vin #?  You would have to hope that there is a "Classic Shelby Know It All" on staff and working that day because you know if the person behind the counter is under 30 most likely wont know anything about Shelby's and there is a 99.999% chance neither will their Boss.

acman63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1047
    • View Profile
    • Shelby Parts and Restoration  since 1977
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2020, 10:18:39 AM »
you bring a registry in  and also a letter from SAAC registrar or someone similar
SAAC Concours Chairman

Owner Shelby Parts and Restoration Since 1977

SAAC original first year member

Coralsnake

  • SAAC Member
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3583
  • Original Posts: 10,264
    • View Profile
    • theCoralsnake.com
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #32 on: June 25, 2020, 10:40:35 AM »
Now that is a good question

Im sure a note from some guy in New Jersey will please the DMV .

Lol
Shelby researcher, theCoralsnake.com webmaster, Conelec CEO

SCJSTU

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
    • View Profile
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2020, 07:12:35 PM »
Question:  How would you go about proving to the DMV that this is one of the Re-Vined 69 Shelby's and should have a 1970 Vin #?  You would have to hope that there is a "Classic Shelby Know It All" on staff and working that day because you know if the person behind the counter is under 30 most likely wont know anything about Shelby's and there is a 99.999% chance neither will their Boss.


yes most folks in the DMV know nothing about cars 25 years or older........but if you have the legal paperwork and it matches the dash vin plate (you have to get one made for the car in this topic) I would think ok......the VIN on these cars does not have the same number of characters as newer cars  so that throws them off first but then they move past that and look at the paperwork
Many Fords,Hot Rods,Motorcycles
I just canít make up my mind

J_Speegle

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2018
  • Just here to help :)
    • View Profile
    • ConcoursMustang.com
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2020, 07:25:31 PM »
yes most folks in the DMV know nothing about cars 25 years or older........but if you have the legal paperwork and it matches the dash vin plate (you have to get one made for the car in this topic) I would think ok......the VIN on these cars does not have the same number of characters as newer cars  so that throws them off first but then they move past that and look at the paperwork

All depends on the state your trying to register the car in and what state its coming from.

It's been my experience that after the car and paperwork does not reflect one another often the process ends or gets pushed towards assigning a new state assigned VIN if the owner doesn't put brakes on the process, thanks them and goes back to develop a second plan.  Of course during the process a VIN in the system either "woken up" again or it's put back in the system along with notes from the inspector.

That's if things go well and they don't choose to keep the car/body.

Not saying this happens all the time and in every state and country - Just saying  ::)
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

Greg

  • SAAC Member
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 844
    • View Profile
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #35 on: June 25, 2020, 08:01:07 PM »
yes most folks in the DMV know nothing about cars 25 years or older........but if you have the legal paperwork and it matches the dash vin plate (you have to get one made for the car in this topic) I would think ok......the VIN on these cars does not have the same number of characters as newer cars  so that throws them off first but then they move past that and look at the paperwork

All depends on the state your trying to register the car in and what state its coming from.

It's been my experience that after the car and paperwork does not reflect one another often the process ends or gets pushed towards assigning a new state assigned VIN if the owner doesn't put brakes on the process, thanks them and goes back to develop a second plan.  Of course during the process a VIN in the system either "woken up" again or it's put back in the system along with notes from the inspector.

That's if things go well and they don't choose to keep the car/body.

Not saying this happens all the time and in every state and country - Just saying  ::)

Words of wisdom Mr. Speegle, I would let the current owner get it all straightened out before I paid for his headache. 

He states..... "I do not know anything about the car other than what I have typed above. Car is sold as-is where is with no warranty and no refunds." 

Run baby run comes to mind  :)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 08:05:11 PM by Greg »
Shelby's and Fords from Day 1

Krelboyne

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2020, 02:53:31 AM »
There are companies that do private vehicle registration services. Check your individual State.

When I first bought one of my Mustangs which was also missing the windshield VIN plate, and it was on a Bill of Sale. Totally legit car, but no record for the VIN in the California DMV database. This was around 2006, AAA had already lost the ability to do lost title transfers in the State of California.

Because the Mustang was a stripped rolling shell, I was turned down flat by the DMV. Went through two different managers, trying to plead my case. Their rules state that since my car was incomplete and not roadworthy, they would not give me a license plates, title and registration. I explained that was only looking to get a title, they said come back when the car is roadworthy. I even reminded them, that by their law, I had 15 days from the sale date to notify the DMV. The highest manager agreed that it was contradictory.

I contacted a private registration company. They inspected the VIN, collected my DMV fees and taxes, and filed the paperwork on my behalf. In 2006, my total cost was $55-65, which included a notary fee. Within 3 weeks, I had a title mailed to me from the California DMV. 
There has to be private registration companies, that can legitimately secure a 1970 title for that car. I am sure that it is on the owner to do their "do diligence".



Scott Behncke - Carchaeologist @ WCCC

honker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
Re: 1970 Shelby GT500 Project
« Reply #37 on: July 04, 2020, 08:05:18 AM »
now reduced  in price.