Author Topic: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop  (Read 2186 times)

A-Snake

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #30 on: October 21, 2020, 05:58:38 PM »

Some people put value in "Concours", some in "Driveability", some in "Speed", some in "Beauty", some in "Mine's Different".
To each his own.

I would add another category to your list of values, originality. An unrestored, never taken apart car can be very highly prized by some.

rmarble57

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #31 on: October 21, 2020, 06:17:56 PM »
Well noted, and you are correct.  My bad for the omission.

427hunter

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #32 on: October 21, 2020, 06:53:10 PM »
Nice synopsis Ruben,

I wouldn't want to pay a premium for a carryover or a 2-digit '67, but I get it.

I was willing to pay a premium to have a Nightmist, 4-speed inboard car tho lucky for me, that premium was smaller at the time.

Now this I understand ! To me the "Morrison" look (ha ha) was the best of the bunch...
2000 hours of my life stolen by 602 over three years

csx289

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2020, 09:54:54 AM »
Random thoughts on the subject:

As with anything it all boils down to personal preference and the collecting goals of the person writing the check. I've been collecting cars for three decades now, and went through my own learning curve of deciding what matters to me and the kind of cars I want to own. I like original unrestored cars, cars with great history, and cars I enjoy driving. Case in point- I had an amazing unrestored '69 Boss 429 for years. Amazing docs and history, a true no BS car. Spent a ton of time making it run right and getting it fully sorted to drive as good as any B9 could drive. But in the end it just sat here because even the best B9 still drives like a dump truck compared to a '65 GT350. So I sold it with the realization that I don't need static display cars. The same reason I sold the ex-Timken KR that Scott Tiemann restored with all NOS parts. It was, at the time, a benchmark restoration. But man I got tired of pushing a car with no fluids in it around my garage. It had to go.

Now I have a collection of cars that all speak to me, great stories, colors I like, rare or unique features (like my narrow hip 427 or original paint '66 GT350 with 14" steel wheels etc) and we drive the heck out of all of them. Sure they madden the purists when they see radial tires or a Napa fuel pump or better mufflers but I have shelves full of the correct original parts and hardware that my family can bolt back on prior to the estate sale lol.

On the other end of the spectrum some shop to a budget and don't care about a color change (lime gold to red for example) or a NOM or a trans swap because they want a cool looking Shelby to have fun with. I totally respect that too. It is still a seat at this great table and the experience is no less exciting.

And, some want perfect shiny restored cars to polish, trailer, show, polish, store, polish, cover, polish, put NOS air into the tires, polish.... ok I'm teasing but you get the point.

Some buy by strictly color and options and I get that too.

Some would never consider an original unrestored car, like my ex-Dave Matthews 67 GT350 #3002, and would rather have a Moss Green 67 like the one that sold for $165k on BaT because it shinier and doesn't show any patina whereas 3002 is one of my favorite '67s.

I had 67 #888, a nightmist blue/ parchment 4 speed GT500. A great one owner car restored to perfection. That car got me because of the color and history but a good friend talked my out of it 13 years ago and still owns it (the bastard! And I know he's reading this too- bastard!)

So in summary to answer the question some (like me) appreciate the uniqueness of a super early two-digit car like 0020, the value of its history, the value of having these great original parts surviving time and the fact it never lost its original engine, etc. There are a lot of things that set it apart and these are the things a lot of seasoned (note I didn't say "old" lol) collectors value now that they have fine tuned their collections to have truly unique and rare examples of these halo cars. That's the kind of collection 0020 is coming out of, the owner is a 35 year Pebble Beach judge who has everything from pre-war Silver Ghosts to a new S550 GT350. And he drives them all. But as somebody who knows what a good collection consists of he's always sought out special cars. Wheat vs. chaff as it may be.

That's the cool thing about cars. One car decide what they like and do what speaks to and pleases their own old car goals. And in the end this hobby is still the great equalizer, doesn't matter if you're a grease monkey like me or a multi-billionaire, we all love these things and can relate to each others passion for them no matter what it may be focused on.

Long, meaningless ramble over ;)

All the best,

Colin

roddster

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #34 on: October 22, 2020, 10:19:06 AM »
  Well stated.  Thank you

S7MS427

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #35 on: October 22, 2020, 12:36:44 PM »
Not meaningless.  Just a statement of the true diversity of the hobby we all so love.  There is room enough in it for all of us regardless of taste.
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68gtcoupe

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #36 on: October 22, 2020, 02:14:29 PM »
Not meaningless.  Just a statement of the true diversity of the hobby we all so love.  There is room enough in it for all of us regardless of taste.

Also very well said.   :)


Greg

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #37 on: October 22, 2020, 03:42:30 PM »
Random thoughts on the subject:

As with anything it all boils down to personal preference and the collecting goals of the person writing the check. I've been collecting cars for three decades now, and went through my own learning curve of deciding what matters to me and the kind of cars I want to own. I like original unrestored cars, cars with great history, and cars I enjoy driving. Case in point- I had an amazing unrestored '69 Boss 429 for years. Amazing docs and history, a true no BS car. Spent a ton of time making it run right and getting it fully sorted to drive as good as any B9 could drive. But in the end it just sat here because even the best B9 still drives like a dump truck compared to a '65 GT350. So I sold it with the realization that I don't need static display cars. The same reason I sold the ex-Timken KR that Scott Tiemann restored with all NOS parts. It was, at the time, a benchmark restoration. But man I got tired of pushing a car with no fluids in it around my garage. It had to go.

Now I have a collection of cars that all speak to me, great stories, colors I like, rare or unique features (like my narrow hip 427 or original paint '66 GT350 with 14" steel wheels etc) and we drive the heck out of all of them. Sure they madden the purists when they see radial tires or a Napa fuel pump or better mufflers but I have shelves full of the correct original parts and hardware that my family can bolt back on prior to the estate sale lol.

On the other end of the spectrum some shop to a budget and don't care about a color change (lime gold to red for example) or a NOM or a trans swap because they want a cool looking Shelby to have fun with. I totally respect that too. It is still a seat at this great table and the experience is no less exciting.

And, some want perfect shiny restored cars to polish, trailer, show, polish, store, polish, cover, polish, put NOS air into the tires, polish.... ok I'm teasing but you get the point.

Some buy by strictly color and options and I get that too.

Some would never consider an original unrestored car, like my ex-Dave Matthews 67 GT350 #3002, and would rather have a Moss Green 67 like the one that sold for $165k on BaT because it shinier and doesn't show any patina whereas 3002 is one of my favorite '67s.

I had 67 #888, a nightmist blue/ parchment 4 speed GT500. A great one owner car restored to perfection. That car got me because of the color and history but a good friend talked my out of it 13 years ago and still owns it (the bastard! And I know he's reading this too- bastard!)

So in summary to answer the question some (like me) appreciate the uniqueness of a super early two-digit car like 0020, the value of its history, the value of having these great original parts surviving time and the fact it never lost its original engine, etc. There are a lot of things that set it apart and these are the things a lot of seasoned (note I didn't say "old" lol) collectors value now that they have fine tuned their collections to have truly unique and rare examples of these halo cars. That's the kind of collection 0020 is coming out of, the owner is a 35 year Pebble Beach judge who has everything from pre-war Silver Ghosts to a new S550 GT350. And he drives them all. But as somebody who knows what a good collection consists of he's always sought out special cars. Wheat vs. chaff as it may be.

That's the cool thing about cars. One car decide what they like and do what speaks to and pleases their own old car goals. And in the end this hobby is still the great equalizer, doesn't matter if you're a grease monkey like me or a multi-billionaire, we all love these things and can relate to each others passion for them no matter what it may be focused on.

Long, meaningless ramble over ;)

All the best,

Colin

There is a lot of wisdom in this post Colin, thank you.  I totally burst out laughing at the dump truck comment LOL
Shelby's and Fords from Day 1

JohnHouston

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Re: '67 GT350, no. 20 - Falcon Hood Prop
« Reply #38 on: October 22, 2020, 03:57:09 PM »
The dump truck thing reminded me of my '56 vette on tires so ancient I can't believe they still hold air . . .it looks great but drives like a very fast tractor.

jpd