Author Topic: interior body panel repair  (Read 762 times)

kasearch@ix.netcom.com

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interior body panel repair
« on: January 07, 2021, 08:11:39 AM »
On my 69 GT500, my interior plastic panels need some touch-up and repair. My quarter trim panels show wear and need some patch work. What material do I use and what is the best way to replicate the grain.  And finally, what paint (original color was black).

CSX 4133

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2021, 09:20:50 AM »

I believe Eastwood makes interior trim paint, you might check into that. I came across this video of how to replicate the graining on interior panels and it looks like it might be worth trying. I would first try their process on a scrap piece of interior plastic if you have one and see if it works.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85FYd9TjLSI
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67 GT350

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2021, 09:31:05 AM »
I wonder how you can fill in a 6 by 9 speaker hole? I would guess if you had a extra panel that had other damage you can graft it and do the youtube trick?
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Bob Gaines

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2021, 12:58:34 PM »
On my 69 GT500, my interior plastic panels need some touch-up and repair. My quarter trim panels show wear and need some patch work. What material do I use and what is the best way to replicate the grain.  And finally, what paint (original color was black).
It is not painted black. It is called dark charcoal metallic or similar name depending on paint vendor. NPD even sells it in rattle cans. Professional paint products shot from a gun are the preferred method for best look .
Bob Gaines,Shelby Enthusiast, Shelby Collector , Shelby Concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

J_Speegle

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2021, 01:57:49 PM »
.............. And finally, what paint (original color was black).

Understand that the interior code decodes in many books and Ford documents as "black" and that it leads many astray on their 67-70 Shelbys.

Common mistake.  Its typically recommended that you strip off all the old coats and grime that can fill the grain. Once stripped lay down a full thin coat of semi-gloss black first as the Dark Charcoal Metallic does not cover well. Then follow with a couple light full somewhat dry coats until you get an even finish. Too much paint and you'll have reduced or no grain left and it can produce a much glossier final look that you don't likely want - unoriginal
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

roddster

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2021, 01:39:05 PM »
  OK, so what about the "repair" of the grain?
    I'd look up (search this forum) for the guy who has been doing this for the 67 rear panels.  Start there first.  I believe he is in the Detroit area and does fantastic work.

J_Speegle

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2021, 06:21:59 PM »
  OK, so what about the "repair" of the grain?
    I'd look up (search this forum) for the guy who has been doing this for the 67 rear panels.  Start there first.  I believe he is in the Detroit area and does fantastic work.

If I've needed to repair or reproduce the grain for larger spots I've used a latex transfer then corrected the edges or if a crack or smaller area I do a 1/2"  repair at a time to the grain connecting the lines in the grain in the filler - sort of a connect a dot pattern then once dry level out the high areas. Not quick, fast or easy. Like anything there are likely better easier ways but just what has worked for me in making pretty much invisible repairs over  the decades
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

shelbymann1970

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Re: interior body panel repair
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2021, 02:19:05 PM »
.............. And finally, what paint (original color was black).

Understand that the interior code decodes in many books and Ford documents as "black" and that it leads many astray on their 67-70 Shelbys.

Common mistake.  Its typically recommended that you strip off all the old coats and grime that can fill the grain. Once stripped lay down a full thin coat of semi-gloss black first as the Dark Charcoal Metallic does not cover well. Then follow with a couple light full somewhat dry coats until you get an even finish. Too much paint and you'll have reduced or no grain left and it can produce a much glossier final look that you don't likely want - unoriginal
+1.  I have a blaster at work and I had a "so-so" dash trim piece with a lot of paint on it. Since the finish I was getting on metal parts i'd thought i'd try that plastic piece. The media stripped it with no damage to the grain. So I did about 30 dash trim spare pieces recently that  I have(radio and end pieces). 1 light coat of black primer then NPD rattle can of NPD charcoal black metallic. I have done many interiors and large pieces i always shot from a PPG quart can of charcoal black metallic with a black primer. No streaking when using a spray gun which is usually the problem with rattle cans on large areas. Now I need to get the info off of the media bags to see what media I'm using in our blaster. Gary
Shelby owner since 1984
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