Author Topic: How significant are the 1969/70 Shelbys and who really ended their production  (Read 3326 times)

shelbydoug

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Shelby was quoted as saying many times more then once, that "the only GT350 I had anything to do with was the '65".

Another quote was "I don't care anything about the Trans Am and those cars".

I love the guy and miss him but I look at the reality as much as I can but Ford was and still is the "money man" and runs the show.

Even Iaccoca was just an employee as "Ford v. Ferrari" attempts to illustrate.



I didn't keep track of when Iaccoca departs Ford but by the time of the end of the "Shelby GT" run, Shel was done and already in Africa taking the elites of the world on hunting expeditions on his "reserve".

HIS car was the Cobra. He accepted the GT40 project to beat Ferrari and the initial GT350 to as Iaccoca said "jazz up the Mustang".

What precisely happened within Ford Corporate is likely very similar to what was speculated in Ford v. Ferrari.

All of the "Shelby's creations" are forever iconic and still remain influential. They likely always will. Ford is the elephant in the room here and whether or not one accepts that doesn't change anything.



The other significant factor that is present is how Shelby influenced Ford's thinking as well as other manufacturers AND THE MARKET PLACE and that IS an almost "God like achievement" for a mere mortal who rose from chicken farming.

Ford jumped on an opportunity with Shelby and renamed an arm of their production train, the Shelby train. It can be said of Ford that they are a lot of things, some of which are kind of ugly but you can't criticize Ford with lacking vision, at least at that time.


Like in the story of the "Frankenstein 'Monster'" to this day, they are attempting to resurrect those 'monsters' by shooting new life into identifiable product names that they created that in fact may be only distant relatives of the originals.

As the quote at the end of the Le mans race goes Miles says "they are out there selling cars already aren't they Shel?" to which he replies, "that's what they do Bulldog".




There is another "story" that is involved in this that so far none have mentioned and maybe should? There was a novel, you know, a book. Those things with way too many printed pages with lots of words on them bound together?

It was called "The Betsy". Now in this story a powerful automotive industrialist gives a job to the son of a distant friend out of keeping a promise to his friend. The "rumor" or suggestion was that the industrialist was Henry Ford and the friend's son was Lee Iaccoca.


Which player in all of this is the critical factor and which is a catalyst? Quite a debate and maybe there should be a book or a movie about it to stimulate further "discussions"?

I vote movie. Those books can get heavy and if you drop one on your foot can do a lot of damage. Plus I already have one book. How many do you really need?

The reality is there is no SIMPLE answer. It's complicated.  ;)


I think what actully happened from 1962-1970 invalidates those quotes you cite.

In what way? He made them well after that when he was around us.


If you are unaware of where 65,66,67 were made and the production changes, SAís involvement in SCCA, AHRA, sponsored drivers, etc (too much to list) then I donít know what to tell you. The man had his hand in everything racing during that period. SA was his company and that is his direct involvement; under your way of thinking he had zero involvement in any car, because in reality he didnít turn a wrench.

I am quite aware of it. Apparently you aren't aware of what he said after all of that ended?


He didnít turn a wrench on a 65 either so whatís your point ?

There is no point in attempting to talk to you. It's like talking to a rock.
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427hunter

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Shelby was quoted as saying many times more then once, that "the only GT350 I had anything to do with was the '65".

Another quote was "I don't care anything about the Trans Am and those cars".

I love the guy and miss him but I look at the reality as much as I can but Ford was and still is the "money man" and runs the show.

Even Iaccoca was just an employee as "Ford v. Ferrari" attempts to illustrate.



I didn't keep track of when Iaccoca departs Ford but by the time of the end of the "Shelby GT" run, Shel was done and already in Africa taking the elites of the world on hunting expeditions on his "reserve".

HIS car was the Cobra. He accepted the GT40 project to beat Ferrari and the initial GT350 to as Iaccoca said "jazz up the Mustang".

What precisely happened within Ford Corporate is likely very similar to what was speculated in Ford v. Ferrari.

All of the "Shelby's creations" are forever iconic and still remain influential. They likely always will. Ford is the elephant in the room here and whether or not one accepts that doesn't change anything.



The other significant factor that is present is how Shelby influenced Ford's thinking as well as other manufacturers AND THE MARKET PLACE and that IS an almost "God like achievement" for a mere mortal who rose from chicken farming.

Ford jumped on an opportunity with Shelby and renamed an arm of their production train, the Shelby train. It can be said of Ford that they are a lot of things, some of which are kind of ugly but you can't criticize Ford with lacking vision, at least at that time.


Like in the story of the "Frankenstein 'Monster'" to this day, they are attempting to resurrect those 'monsters' by shooting new life into identifiable product names that they created that in fact may be only distant relatives of the originals.

As the quote at the end of the Le mans race goes Miles says "they are out there selling cars already aren't they Shel?" to which he replies, "that's what they do Bulldog".




There is another "story" that is involved in this that so far none have mentioned and maybe should? There was a novel, you know, a book. Those things with way too many printed pages with lots of words on them bound together?

It was called "The Betsy". Now in this story a powerful automotive industrialist gives a job to the son of a distant friend out of keeping a promise to his friend. The "rumor" or suggestion was that the industrialist was Henry Ford and the friend's son was Lee Iaccoca.


Which player in all of this is the critical factor and which is a catalyst? Quite a debate and maybe there should be a book or a movie about it to stimulate further "discussions"?

I vote movie. Those books can get heavy and if you drop one on your foot can do a lot of damage. Plus I already have one book. How many do you really need?

The reality is there is no SIMPLE answer. It's complicated.  ;)


I think what actully happened from 1962-1970 invalidates those quotes you cite.

In what way? He made them well after that when he was around us.


If you are unaware of where 65,66,67 were made and the production changes, SAís involvement in SCCA, AHRA, sponsored drivers, etc (too much to list) then I donít know what to tell you. The man had his hand in everything racing during that period. SA was his company and that is his direct involvement; under your way of thinking he had zero involvement in any car, because in reality he didnít turn a wrench.

I am quite aware of it. Apparently you aren't aware of what he said after all of that ended?


He didnít turn a wrench on a 65 either so whatís your point ?

There is no point in attempting to talk to you. It's like talking to a rock.


Not everyone can be as enlightened as you  ::)
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With C.S., A. O. Smith and FOMOCOs collaboration on this model it makes them so unique as no other year had so many entities in a production Shelby.

These Shelbys always retained a unique identity and for 1969, featured probably the most unique add on items. A longer fiberglass front end, special grille, unique hood trim, unique fender chrome eyelets, a truly unique front bumper, sequential taillights and revised exhaust outlets, plus an aggressive unique hood with no less than five functional NACA-style air scoops, rear fiberglass deck lid with end caps with the mesh and S H EL B Y lettering.

Front and rear air scoops ducted cool air to the brakes and inside, a roll bar, inertia-reel racing harnesses, luxurious amenities, and special trim maintained the performance-oriented and limited production. Makes theses Shelbys so interesting, beautiful and special.

Simply the best
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Going to close this topic for a while... sanitize the garbage ...and reopen it later