Author Topic: gas tank vent tube  (Read 553 times)

johnzajc@gmail.com

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gas tank vent tube
« on: October 18, 2018, 09:47:23 PM »
Hi----I do need some help and advise with gas tank vent---first is correct rubber tube same as gas line [ one piece is at fuel inlet filler tube and the other from wheel well to undercarriage rail] also are clamp same as gas line to sending unit---and also clamp on rail is it any particular design----thank you  r

J_Speegle

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Re: gas tank vent tube
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 10:32:19 PM »
Don't see any clamps called out in the offical instructions or in pictures I have of unrestored examples









Hope this helps
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

Bob Gaines

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Re: gas tank vent tube
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2018, 11:16:40 PM »
Hi----I do need some help and advise with gas tank vent---first is correct rubber tube same as gas line [ one piece is at fuel inlet filler tube and the other from wheel well to undercarriage rail] also are clamp same as gas line to sending unit---and also clamp on rail is it any particular design----thank you  r
Yes fuel line is what was typically used or similar. It was cut from bulk .
Also no clamps is typical . It does not build much if any pressure so they are not needed. Also it is important to note that the vent fitting in the filler neck needs to have the hole that it threads into done in a certain way. The hole is not drilled which also may introduce unnecessary metal filling into the fuel system . The hole is started with a punch . If you are scared to do that to begin with then a 1/8 drill . That will not introduce to many filings. You don't want anything to prematurely clog up the filter sock of the fuel sender. You want to enlarge the hole with progressively larger hole punch etc. until you get to the size where the fitting will thread in . The progressive enlarging of the hole and the folding of the metal will provide sides to the hole needed for the threads of the fitting to bite into. The sides of the hole will give that extra bite that a drilled hole would not allow. It should tighten up snug where the drilled hole would easily strip out and spin.  Be careful to only enlarge enough so the fitting will thread . If you go too big it is too late and most likely will require a different gas filler neck. You want to also add a rubber O ring to the fitting as a extra sealing precaution. I don't think it is mandatory however it is better to be safe besides that is the way I have typically found the dealer done systems.     
Bob Gaines,Shelby Enthusiast, Shelby Collector , Shelby Concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

johnzajc@gmail.com

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Re: gas tank vent tube
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2018, 12:49:31 AM »
Thanks a million Mr. Gaines and Speegle--between photos and narrative instructions are so conclusive that even I with 2 left hands can understand how to execute the task---thanks again 

Special Ed

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Re: gas tank vent tube
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2018, 08:45:40 AM »
I have seen many 69 shelbys that never got the gas tank recall (including mine) as it was more of a problem in the far south from the extreme heat & the gt 500 crossflow muffler position heating  up the gas tank fuel that under certain heat conditions & timing distributor setting could cause a problem.

Bob Gaines

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Re: gas tank vent tube
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2018, 01:40:24 PM »
I have seen many 69 shelbys that never got the gas tank recall (including mine) as it was more of a problem in the far south from the extreme heat & the gt 500 crossflow muffler position heating  up the gas tank fuel that under certain heat conditions & timing distributor setting could cause a problem.
I agree with Ed that for many years I saw 69/70 GT500's without the recall. I owned and drove many over the years that didn't have it. I didn't think much about it even though I had a brother in law that had a 69 gt500 automatic that when driving from KC to the west coast was between Reno and the bay area had his car catch fire for that exact reason. That was in late 1969 or early 70. I don't know the number to this day as back then those details didn't mean much .He told the story that it was night and cars kept trying to pass him and since he was not one to let that happen and being on the highway he would speed up .He started to get suspicious when more and more people tried to catch up with him. He said finally a guy in a Cadillac pulled along side of him as they were going about 120 mph and pointed at the back of his car. They both stopped and the fire went out. The other driver said it looked like a jet after burner in the dark desert night. All the other people were trying to warn him too but he thought they were just trying to pass him.  ::)  The fire went out when he stopped but melted the entire back fiberglass portion of the car.   His car had to be one of the firsts I think because I remember talking on the phone with him while he was stuck in SF  waiting for repairs. He said that the Ford people didn't know what happened and were so concerned that they were thinking about air freighting the car to Detroit to examine. In the end they sent engineers to the west coast to examine the car. It took almost 4 weeks until he was back on the road again . In the early 80's I sold a  69 SCJ 4 speed GT500 to a guy in Texas and he drove the car home from KC .It was summer and I thought all was good until I got a call from him about a week later asking to keep my eye out for a trunklid, end caps and tailpanel. I asked what happened and he said that about the Oklahoma border  the rear of the car caught fire and when he pulled over it went out but the back was ruined. I didn't know what to say but apologized that I had heard of that happening but thought it was very rare. He said he didn't blame me and that he had other 69 GT500's and never had the problem but had heard of occurrences before too. I helped him find replacement parts but I thought this is too much of a coincidence and besides doing the recall on every 69/70 GT500 I have had since, I don't miss a opportunity now to let other 69 GT500 owners know not to tempt fate. Under the right conditions it could happen to them.  A trailered show car is not going to be a problem but on a pleasure driven car it might just ruin your day under the right conditions. 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2018, 01:44:37 PM by Bob Gaines »
Bob Gaines,Shelby Enthusiast, Shelby Collector , Shelby Concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby