Author Topic: 69 Dearborn Undercarriage Finishing - A Guide  (Read 2543 times)

Coralsnake

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Re: 69 Dearborn Undercarriage Finishing - A Guide
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2018, 09:42:58 AM »
Considering there are pictures documenting the process, I would say its pretty firm. Smith had specific procedures to follow.

This is just my opinion, dont take it personally...everytime there is a discussion of 1969s, there seems to be one car that is an exception, that would make me wonder....

Wasnt your car sent overseas and modified ?

It may not be a good example to use as a model. Knowing Mr Speegle and others who have documented these items, they tend to take years to come to their conclusions, constantly tweaking their conclusions, looking at many cars and concentrating on cars that are known not to have been modified.



« Last Edit: May 04, 2018, 09:53:20 AM by Coralsnake »
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Bob Gaines

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Re: 69 Dearborn Undercarriage Finishing - A Guide
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2018, 09:33:01 PM »
Jeff I have had this discussion before with some here on some of these processes. When were these pics taken? could the processes have been changed during the year?  When I tore my vert down for  it's first time I investigated for the grill color. At one time the grill and buckets were painted black. When the stone guard was removed both headlight buckets  had what appeared to be dark argent metallic on them where the guard overlapped the buckets. The backside of the grill appeared to have the same. I had Painter's supply color match all 3 pieces and told them I suspected dark argent. It matched. I was told it would be impossible for my car to have  that paint on the backside of my grill(used upper grill bracket area) but it did. I have torn apart many Mustangs  since 1977 and I know my car had never been taken apart. To me it would make sense to change the process of painting the body color parts together and spraying all the grill and bucket components in batches. Then assemble. The process shown here doesn't make sense for productivity nor waste of masking paper and tape. But the process shown  here is why we see  varying taped off areas by the hood tie down brackets sprayed dark argent metallic on many Shelbys. I remember 3052 had no  dark argent paint on the fenders at all unlike earlier cars I have seen and that car had all original paint under the hood. Gary
Gary, FYI the pictures with minimal paper and tape in reply #6 are A O Smith . The pictures of maximum paper and tape in reply #12 are A O Speegle  :D (extra masking added because A O Speegle and his crew had a higher budget  ;) . There was not much masking done as the factory pictures show.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2018, 09:55:19 PM by Bob Gaines »
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J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Dearborn Undercarriage Finishing - A Guide
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2018, 09:52:23 PM »
Jeff I have had this discussion before with some here on some of these processes. When were these pics taken?


We don't know the exact date the pictures were each taken or if they were taken all the same day.


could the processes have been changed during the year?

Haven't found a difference and not sure if changing the process would have changed the outcome or final product.

If you believe you found one I invite you to find and document 3 more unrestored examples built at the same time as each other and introduce them into a new thread for discussion. Current practice some of us have agreed to is to have a minimum base so that we don't change back and forth ever time we find something different on a single car. Too many PO changes and odd things done over the year and those that we're trying to help would surely be confused if we changed our understandings as often as we changes shirts ;)






 When I tore my vert down for  it's first time I investigated for the grill color. At one time the grill and buckets were painted black. When the stone guard was removed both headlight buckets  had what appeared to be dark argent metallic on them where the guard overlapped the buckets. The backside of the grill appeared to have the same. I had Painter's supply color match all 3 pieces and told them I suspected dark argent. It matched. I was told it would be impossible for my car to have  that paint on the backside of my grill(used upper grill bracket area) but it did. I have torn apart many Mustangs  since 1977 and I know my car had never been taken apart. To me it would make sense to change the process of painting the body color parts together and spraying all the grill and bucket components in batches. Then assemble. The process shown here doesn't make sense for productivity nor waste of masking paper and tape. But the process shown  here is why we see  varying taped off areas by the hood tie down brackets sprayed dark argent metallic on many Shelbys. I remember 3052 had no  dark argent paint on the fenders at all unlike earlier cars I have seen and that car had all original paint under the hood. Gary
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Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge