Author Topic: What tires and size is recommended  (Read 1960 times)

427hunter

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2019, 02:44:41 AM »
I have G60-15 polyglas on mine, they drive just fine on bias ply tires..
In your case " fine" is a relative term I suppose. ;) To the vast majority of those that have driven on both a different not as favorable term can be substituted.  That is OK ,to each their own. :D

If people are driving around on a worn out frontend or rock hard bias ply's I can see why they have had a bad experience with bias ply tires ::)   

I have radials on my boss car and bias on my Shelby (to compare apples to apples - my other cars are not fords) and they don't drive any different if your front end and steering box are not worn out. If you have a beater (which my 70 b2 is) then radials are fine but on a restored car they don't look right, but BFG's are a lot cheaper..
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 02:47:22 AM by 427hunter »
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shelbydoug

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2019, 09:04:44 AM »
I have G60-15 polyglas on mine, they drive just fine on bias ply tires..
In your case " fine" is a relative term I suppose. ;) To the vast majority of those that have driven on both a different not as favorable term can be substituted.  That is OK ,to each their own. :D

If people are driving around on a worn out frontend or rock hard bias ply's I can see why they have had a bad experience with bias ply tires ::)   

I have radials on my boss car and bias on my Shelby (to compare apples to apples - my other cars are not fords) and they don't drive any different if your front end and steering box are not worn out. If you have a beater (which my 70 b2 is) then radials are fine but on a restored car they don't look right, but BFG's are a lot cheaper..

Goodyear bias ply Polyglass tires are very popular cosmetically but functionally if not fully lethal, then semi-lethal. They simply are not capable of enabling these cars to be driven as intended.

Many of us here were driving on these things when new and they were never good even brand new. I was. I'm happy that I survived that era and those tires.

It's a free country and you are certainly free to do what you please. It's your car. Claiming that they are a competent tire won't get you much sympathy here. Many of us know better.

I suppose though that it is the current climate to debate what the meaning of any word actually is? The term alternative facts comes up a lot. I suppose that gets to the basis of even a word like yes. Does it mean yes or something else?

Some are wise enough to realize that the comment, "those that refuse to learn from history are doomed to repeat it" has a very large degree of accuracy.

I put it more simply. Fool me once shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I won't be fooled by those tires again.

427hunter

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2019, 12:00:15 PM »
I have G60-15 polyglas on mine, they drive just fine on bias ply tires..
In your case " fine" is a relative term I suppose. ;) To the vast majority of those that have driven on both a different not as favorable term can be substituted.  That is OK ,to each their own. :D

If people are driving around on a worn out frontend or rock hard bias ply's I can see why they have had a bad experience with bias ply tires ::)   

I have radials on my boss car and bias on my Shelby (to compare apples to apples - my other cars are not fords) and they don't drive any different if your front end and steering box are not worn out. If you have a beater (which my 70 b2 is) then radials are fine but on a restored car they don't look right, but BFG's are a lot cheaper..

Goodyear bias ply Polyglass tires are very popular cosmetically but functionally if not fully lethal, then semi-lethal. They simply are not capable of enabling these cars to be driven as intended.

Many of us here were driving on these things when new and they were never good even brand new. I was. I'm happy that I survived that era and those tires.

It's a free country and you are certainly free to do what you please. It's your car. Claiming that they are a competent tire won't get you much sympathy here. Many of us know better.

I suppose though that it is the current climate to debate what the meaning of any word actually is? The term alternative facts comes up a lot. I suppose that gets to the basis of even a word like yes. Does it mean yes or something else?

Some are wise enough to realize that the comment, "those that refuse to learn from history are doomed to repeat it" has a very large degree of accuracy.

I put it more simply. Fool me once shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I won't be fooled by those tires again.


 "functionally if not fully lethal, then semi-lethal" please explain this one  :) I know people love to be dramatic but this is a little  :o
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shelbydoug

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2019, 12:15:35 PM »
Sure. They rebound terribly from imperfections in the road. You can not safely drive them in the rain. Wet pavement is like driving on snow.

The sidewalls are only 2 ply and tend to develop separations in the walls that can be observed as bubbles or more closely resembling lymphnoma swelling in the glands of the throat.

Their ride hardness contributes to a lengthening of braking distances.

As far as practicality, they are done by 8,000 to 10,000 miles.

Considering how expensive the reproductions are, Avons with the GOODYEAR lettering applied to the walls is a much better solution.

They were no doubt a sales success at selling "high performance" tires to the public then and Shelby was a Goodyear tire distributor so had special interest in promoting them as well.

Side-Oilers

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2019, 12:44:53 PM »
Sure. They rebound terribly from imperfections in the road. You can not safely drive them in the rain. Wet pavement is like driving on snow.

The sidewalls are only 2 ply and tend to develop separations in the walls that can be observed as bubbles or more closely resembling lymphnoma swelling in the glands of the throat.

Their ride hardness contributes to a lengthening of braking distances.

As far as practicality, they are done by 8,000 to 10,000 miles.

Considering how expensive the reproductions are, Avons with the GOODYEAR lettering applied to the walls is a much better solution.

They were no doubt a sales success at selling "high performance" tires to the public then and Shelby was a Goodyear tire distributor so had special interest in promoting them as well.


IMO, one of the only good things to be said about any 1960s "high performance" bias ply street tire is that they were better than the crappy 1950s tires, 1940s tires, 1930s, tires, et al.  At least you could (usually) take a new Polyglas up to a sustained 100 mph without pieces of the tread coming apart and flying off.

That said, it does look cool to have the correct vintage tires on a correct vintage car.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 01:25:10 PM by Side-Oilers »
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427hunter

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2019, 01:16:58 PM »
Sure. They rebound terribly from imperfections in the road. You can not safely drive them in the rain. Wet pavement is like driving on snow.

The sidewalls are only 2 ply and tend to develop separations in the walls that can be observed as bubbles or more closely resembling lymphnoma swelling in the glands of the throat.

Their ride hardness contributes to a lengthening of braking distances.

As far as practicality, they are done by 8,000 to 10,000 miles.

Considering how expensive the reproductions are, Avons with the GOODYEAR lettering applied to the walls is a much better solution.

They were no doubt a sales success at selling "high performance" tires to the public then and Shelby was a Goodyear tire distributor so had special interest in promoting them as well.

First off my biggest issue with radial tires today is they don't last because of the recycled rubber that they use. This recycled compound causes them to crack, flat spot and throw belts. I bought a reproduction set of f60's in 2002 and they are still soft and black with no cracking because they are rubber not recycled material. Radials turn brown and fall apart about every 5 years. If your going to be driving in the rain old radials are just as bad as old bias. I get you don't like the tires but you are a little over the top with your rhetoric.

 My 66 vette has bias on it and my 70 z28 has radials and they both don't drive that well. It's not because of the tires, it's because the steering boxes on both car have almost 100,000 miles on them, and I have older hard radial Dunlop tires on the z28 - which obviously doesn't help. Three of my Plymouth's have radials on them one has bias, they all drive about the same. My two fords as I stated above drive about the same. It's more about suspension, steering box, and alignment then tire today IMO. If this was 1985 I would agree with you. The first thing I did back then was ditch old bias tires and throw radial's on the car. In 2019 for a car I drive in fair weather and to shows, I will take bias over radials any day because they last longer and stay black.           
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shelbydoug

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #21 on: May 01, 2019, 02:40:57 PM »
Sure. They rebound terribly from imperfections in the road. You can not safely drive them in the rain. Wet pavement is like driving on snow.

The sidewalls are only 2 ply and tend to develop separations in the walls that can be observed as bubbles or more closely resembling lymphnoma swelling in the glands of the throat.

Their ride hardness contributes to a lengthening of braking distances.

As far as practicality, they are done by 8,000 to 10,000 miles.

Considering how expensive the reproductions are, Avons with the GOODYEAR lettering applied to the walls is a much better solution.

They were no doubt a sales success at selling "high performance" tires to the public then and Shelby was a Goodyear tire distributor so had special interest in promoting them as well.

First off my biggest issue with radial tires today is they don't last because of the recycled rubber that they use. This recycled compound causes them to crack, flat spot and throw belts. I bought a reproduction set of f60's in 2002 and they are still soft and black with no cracking because they are rubber not recycled material. Radials turn brown and fall apart about every 5 years. If your going to be driving in the rain old radials are just as bad as old bias. I get you don't like the tires but you are a little over the top with your rhetoric.

 My 66 vette has bias on it and my 70 z28 has radials and they both don't drive that well. It's not because of the tires, it's because the steering boxes on both car have almost 100,000 miles on them, and I have older hard radial Dunlop tires on the z28 - which obviously doesn't help. Three of my Plymouth's have radials on them one has bias, they all drive about the same. My two fords as I stated above drive about the same. It's more about suspension, steering box, and alignment then tire today IMO. If this was 1985 I would agree with you. The first thing I did back then was ditch old bias tires and throw radial's on the car. In 2019 for a car I drive in fair weather and to shows, I will take bias over radials any day because they last longer and stay black.           

It's not rhetoric. It is my opinion, yes.

If you don't like other opinions that's fine, but don't ask for them.

Make your own discoveries and mistakes.

You can't please everyone so you've got to please yourself. Enough from me. I don't know nuthin'.  ;)

427hunter

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #22 on: May 01, 2019, 04:33:15 PM »
Sure. They rebound terribly from imperfections in the road. You can not safely drive them in the rain. Wet pavement is like driving on snow.

The sidewalls are only 2 ply and tend to develop separations in the walls that can be observed as bubbles or more closely resembling lymphnoma swelling in the glands of the throat.

Their ride hardness contributes to a lengthening of braking distances.

As far as practicality, they are done by 8,000 to 10,000 miles.

Considering how expensive the reproductions are, Avons with the GOODYEAR lettering applied to the walls is a much better solution.

They were no doubt a sales success at selling "high performance" tires to the public then and Shelby was a Goodyear tire distributor so had special interest in promoting them as well.

First off my biggest issue with radial tires today is they don't last because of the recycled rubber that they use. This recycled compound causes them to crack, flat spot and throw belts. I bought a reproduction set of f60's in 2002 and they are still soft and black with no cracking because they are rubber not recycled material. Radials turn brown and fall apart about every 5 years. If your going to be driving in the rain old radials are just as bad as old bias. I get you don't like the tires but you are a little over the top with your rhetoric.

 My 66 vette has bias on it and my 70 z28 has radials and they both don't drive that well. It's not because of the tires, it's because the steering boxes on both car have almost 100,000 miles on them, and I have older hard radial Dunlop tires on the z28 - which obviously doesn't help. Three of my Plymouth's have radials on them one has bias, they all drive about the same. My two fords as I stated above drive about the same. It's more about suspension, steering box, and alignment then tire today IMO. If this was 1985 I would agree with you. The first thing I did back then was ditch old bias tires and throw radial's on the car. In 2019 for a car I drive in fair weather and to shows, I will take bias over radials any day because they last longer and stay black.           

It's not rhetoric. It is my opinion, yes.

If you don't like other opinions that's fine, but don't ask for them.

Make your own discoveries and mistakes.

You can't please everyone so you've got to please yourself. Enough from me. I don't know nuthin'.  ;)


When did I ask for your opinion? I was responding to the guys question just like you..
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shelbymann1970

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2019, 09:35:03 AM »
I had a fully restored-new suspension, shocks, etc on a 428 CJ 69 Mach1. I had F-70-14s on it. I can tell you first hand that they would catch every line/crack in the road and move with it. VERY different than radials I have had on my other restored cars. Non radials are for Show trailered cars for me and I'll stick to my radials on cars I drive on roads-especially here in Mi.
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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2019, 09:43:18 AM »
definitely if its driven + 1

I had a fully restored-new suspension, shocks, etc on a 428 CJ 69 Mach1. I had F-70-14s on it. I can tell you first hand that they would catch every line/crack in the road and move with it. VERY different than radials I have had on my other restored cars. Non radials are for Show trailered cars for me and I'll stick to my radials on cars I drive on roads-especially here in Mi.

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427hunter

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Re: What tires and size is recommended
« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2019, 12:06:30 PM »
I drive my cars all the time it's funny that you guys are so emotional over this issue... Maybe this was a micro aggression on my part and I invaded the radial tire safe space  ;)
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