Author Topic: rear springs  (Read 415 times)

johnzajc@gmail.com

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rear springs
« on: October 22, 2019, 10:05:05 PM »
Hi---my next endeavor are rear leaf springs---years ago we painted them supposingly correct colour---now is time for correction--We got stainless steel tank build to correct size to do them all together---my question , do I use same Mangonise / phosphate and finish them with W4o or do I phosphate them and then dip in other type oil, if so to what temperature do I heat oil or is there any other step in process------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P.S--I would be more than happy to do same to any other serious owner free of charge ,I would love to show some gratitude for all the advise and encouragement I received from dedicated and charitable members---thank you

J_Speegle

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Re: rear springs
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2019, 11:05:54 PM »
Would suggest something that will last longer than WD40. Looks at some of the micro film oils developed for the military or aerospace. Many use and have been happy with Boeshield T-9. There are some products that do a good job of long term protection but may affect the life of rubber items that make up the final assembly.

Yes some have used magnésium phosphate to reproduce the oil quenched heater original finish along with other product/choices. Final look/finish is the the target
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

Special Ed

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Re: rear springs
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2019, 11:32:09 PM »
Just did a set of springs with gun blue and heat  treated with rpm from ecs . Phosphate and oil is good but not correct factory spring steel heat treated blackish blueish tint finish.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2019, 11:36:29 PM by Special Ed »

johnzajc@gmail.com

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Re: rear springs
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2019, 02:23:22 AM »
Hi--thank you for input--have read a lot of articles about Gun bluing and heat treatment with RPM, however conclusion would be that there is more to it than just buy product---is it possible that you  would would share step by step process, I am sure there is a lot of us that would be very grateful. No I am not owner/builder but somebody that has paid handsomely so called real car /restorer and rather than continue with frustration listening to excuses and empty promises decided to put time and effort to address discrepancies . So fur I am making continues progress due to enormes input from members. Believe me had I known better it would be astronomically cheaper to have all done initially by well known shop--thank you     

J_Speegle

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Re: rear springs
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2019, 04:36:13 AM »
Some have used InstaBlack also successfully. I've not been really successful with gun bluing for rear springs just because of the large surfaces and getting a consistent even finish/tone I was happy with.  If you got a set done Ed congratulations

May be I'll give it (Gun bluing repair fluid) another try on leaf springs since I've been using it for just about everything else for 20 plus years.
Jeff Speegle- Mustang & Shelby detail collector, ConcoursMustang.com babysitter :) and Judge

CharlesTurner

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Re: rear springs
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2019, 10:04:48 AM »
Gun blue can be applied with a foam applicator, it takes several applications to achieve consistency.  Some steel wool in-between coats also helps with that.

Insta-blak is also another good option, it's a bit pricey though, so would be expensive to buy and totally immerse the parts.  I've put it in a spray bottle and hung up leaf springs for application.

With either gun blue or insta-blak, they need to be rinsed with water, thoroughly dried and a rust inhibitor applied.  The ECS product is the best I have found.  It has to be something that leaves a film.  Boeshield or cosmoline do not have the mil coverage to protect for long periods.  Nothing worse than having to steel wool already assembled leaf springs that have surface rust everywhere!
Charles Turner
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