Author Topic: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?  (Read 650 times)

ITHERTZ

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Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« on: November 18, 2019, 12:10:47 PM »
Can anybody identify the guy in the passenger seat?

prototypefan

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2019, 12:19:27 PM »
Looks like Remington to me

silverton_ford

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2019, 12:38:00 PM »
Not Remington.   This is in Moon's shop before Shelby acquired Renentlow's shop and Remington to the payroll.  This is most likely one of Moon's guys.  I don't know a name for sure.
Thank you, Brian Littlefield

1966 Mustang fastback with Shelby parts
1969 Fairlane Cobra 428CJ 4 speed fastback
and a few other Fords.

ITHERTZ

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2019, 01:08:31 PM »
Thanks for the help guys.  Hoping somebody can identify him as a good friend of mine looks very much like him and I'd like to know more info and see if there may even be more photos of the guy.

Troy
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 01:11:03 PM by ITHERTZ »

MichaelM

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2019, 04:13:57 AM »
That's Fred Larsen who worked for Dean Moon as a machinist at the time. He was a very well known hot rodder, dry lakes racer and drag racer.

MichaelM

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Bill Collins

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2019, 10:26:16 AM »
Thanks for the help guys.  Hoping somebody can identify him as a good friend of mine looks very much like him and I'd like to know more info and see if there may even be more photos of the guy.Troy

Speaking of people who look like other people - does the fellow sanding the trunk in the photo not resemble Matt Damon? Spooky.

pbf777

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2019, 10:33:30 AM »
      As exhibited in the 5th picture, the drive shaft engineering suffers, as it appears to short, but perhaps required in order to swing into position?  Perhaps there is more than the typically observed splined mainshaft in length versus the tail housing?         :-\

     Scott.

Dan Case

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2019, 11:36:00 AM »
      As exhibited in the 5th picture, the drive shaft engineering suffers, as it appears to short, but perhaps required in order to swing into position?  Perhaps there is more than the typically observed splined mainshaft in length versus the tail housing?         :-\

     Scott.

The splined slip shaft (yoke in Ford terminology, in this case a 1959 model year Ford "B9A-4841-C Yoke and Seal Assy" in the Shelby American parts book) is much longer than you can see in that image. Much of the slip shaft is inside the transmission.  Unlike cars with "live" rear axles the differential is fixed in place so the slip shaft doesn't move in and out while the car is driven like let's say a Mustang's does.

One has to only push the yoke deeper into the transmission as seen enough to clear flanges on that aluminum panel that forms a shelf behind the seats to get a Cobra's drive shaft in.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 11:44:54 AM by Dan Case »
Dan Case
1964 Cobra owner since 1983, Cobra crazy since I saw my first one in the mid 1960s in Huntsville, AL.

JD

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2019, 12:57:49 PM »
There are captions under each of the images that help identify some of the people...

'67 Shelby Headlight Bucket Grommets http://www.saacforum.com/index.php?topic=254.0
'67 Shelby Lower Grille Edge Protective Strip http://www.saacforum.com/index.php?topic=1237.0

pbf777

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2019, 07:23:26 PM »

The splined slip shaft (yoke in Ford terminology,........................ is much longer than you can see in that image. Much of the slip shaft is inside the transmission.

     Yes, but the concern here is that in component assemblies which allow motion, there is inevitably defection in a plane unappreciated, and in the driveshaft (propeller-shaft for those with hoods & bonnets as I realize the English lineage   ::)) particularly, the relationship of the slip-yoke spline juncture to transmission main/out-put shaft, with additional responsibilities required of the slip-yoke bushing fixed within the tail housing, this deflection caused both by torque applied and centrifugal forces, causes the driveline to exhibit a "break", most pronounced at the U-joint nearest the slip-yoke, accompanied by an angle correction at the U-joint at the differential; hence one would want to keep the distance of the U-joint as "choked-up" as possible to the slip-spline relationship as possible as this will reduce the sum of the "break" in the alinement otherwise, and the resultant imbalance vibrations incurred, even if the structure is sufficient to provide acceptable service.       ;)


Unlike cars with "live" rear axles the differential is fixed in place so the slip shaft doesn't move in and out while the car is driven like let's say a Mustang's does.

One has to only push the yoke deeper into the transmission as seen enough to clear flanges on that aluminum panel that forms a shelf behind the seats to get a Cobra's drive shaft in.


     Yes, I understand this; and that is why I previously stated that perhaps that sum of distance may be required in order to  .......... "swing (the driveshaft) into position".  But, I am skeptical of the implied requirement observed in the photo.  But, I do also realize that this is a relatively short driveshaft, of not great mass, and not lending itself to great sums of deflection,  and also that there may be another unseen (my me anyway, and I sure wouldn't compromise the mechanical requirements for something like sheet metal) responsibility or relationship not apparent in the photo, hence my inquiry.        :-\

     Scott.   





Dan Case

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Re: Who's the guy pointing in the passenger seat CSX 2000?
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2019, 08:42:56 PM »

     Yes, I understand this; and that is why I previously stated that perhaps that sum of distance may be required in order to  .......... "swing (the driveshaft) into position".  But, I am skeptical of the implied requirement observed in the photo.  But, I do also realize that this is a relatively short driveshaft, of not great mass, and not lending itself to great sums of deflection,  and also that there may be another unseen (my me anyway, and I sure wouldn't compromise the mechanical requirements for something like sheet metal) responsibility or relationship not apparent in the photo, hence my inquiry.        :-\

     Scott.   

Good points.

I apologize to the original poster but factory drive shaft assemblies (provided by AC Cars) did pretty well even if better design could have been implemented. In many ways the entire Cobra design was intended to be as light as they could be and get to the end of races in terms of early 1960s power and tires. They were not intended to last forever.  Even spherical rod ends for throttle bell cranks were hollow shank parts.  Race engines had excess metal machined off intake manifold as compared to what Shelby sold to customers. Light weight almost everything was incorporated. As compared to almost any other car everything in a Cobra chassis could have been more robust.  Continental Cars, Shelby American, Ford, and AC Cars had to deal with some parts and structures just too light duty to survive racing.  Serious racers were rebuilt from the ground up often and it was intended that street Cobra chassis be serviced frequently, early 1960s British race car style. 

The output shaft of the transmission extends out past the end of the tail shaft housing. There is enough shaft poking out to be able to manually turn the shaft from that end if you wish when you have a transmission out. Without going out, removing the seats and transmission cover, and disconnecting the drive shaft on our black car and pushing it all the way forward I canít tell you how much more travel is left.

« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 04:43:24 PM by Dan Case »
Dan Case
1964 Cobra owner since 1983, Cobra crazy since I saw my first one in the mid 1960s in Huntsville, AL.